Yuri Anime Hentai Review with Sexiest Pics


Yuri also known by the wasei-eigo construction girls’ love , is a genre of Japanese media focusing on intimate relationships between female characters. While lesbianism is a commonly associated theme, the genre is inclusive of works depicting emotional and spiritual relationships between women that are not necessarily romantic or sexual in nature. Yuri is most commonly associated with anime and manga, though the term has also been used to describe video games, light novels, and literature.

Themes associated with yuri originate from Japanese lesbian fiction of the early twentieth century, notably the writings of Nobuko Yoshiya and literature in the Class S genre. Manga depicting female homoeroticism began to appear in the 1970s in the works of artists associated with the Year 24 Group, notably Ryoko Yamagishi and Riyoko Ikeda. The genre gained wider popularity beginning in the 1990s; the founding of Yuri Shimai in 2003 as the first manga magazine devoted exclusively to yuri, followed by its successor Comic Yuri Hime in 2005, led to the establishment of yuri as a discrete publishing genre and the creation of a yuri fan culture.

Terminology and etymology

The word yuri translates literally to “lily”, and is a relatively common Japanese feminine name. White lilies have been used since the Romantic era of Japanese literature to symbolize beauty and purity in women, and are a de facto symbol of the yuri genre.

In 1976, Bungaku Itō editor of the gay men’s magazine Barazoku used the term yurizoku in reference to female readers of the magazine in a column of letters titled Yurizoku no Heya While not all women whose letters appeared in Yurizoku no Heya were lesbians, and it is unclear whether the column was the first instance of the term yuri in this context, an association of yuri with lesbianism subsequently developed. For example, the tanbi magazine Allan began publishing Yuri Tsūshin in July 1983 as a personal ad column for “lesbiennes” to communicate.

The wasei-eigo construction “girls’ love” and its abbreviation “GL” were adopted by Japanese publishers in the 2000s, likely as an antonym of the male-male romance genre boys’ love. While the term is generally considered synonymous with yuri, in rare cases it is used to denote yuri media that is sexually explicit, following the publication of the erotic yuri manga anthology Girls Love by Ichijinsha in 2011. However, this distinction is infrequently made, and yuri and “girls’ love” are almost always used interchangeably.

History

Among the first Japanese authors to produce works about love between women was Nobuko Yoshiya, a novelist active in the Taishō and Shōwa periods.Yoshiya was a pioneer in Japanese lesbian literature, including the early twentieth century Class S genre. Her works popularized many of the ideas and tropes which drove yuri genre for years to come. Class S stories depict lesbian attachments as emotionally intense yet platonic relationships, destined to be curtailed by graduation from school, marriage, or death.

Traditionally, Class S stories focus on strong emotional bonds between an upperclassman and an underclassman, or in rare cases, between a student and her teacher. Private all-girls schools are a common setting for Class S stories, which are depicted as an idyllic homosocial world reserved for women. Works in the genre focus heavily on the beauty and innocence of their protagonists, a theme that would recur in yuri. Critics have alternately considered Class S as a distinct genre from yuri, as a “proto-yuri”, and a component of yuri.

Concepts and themes

Yuri as a genre depicts intimate relationships between women, a scope that is broadly defined to include romantic love, intense friendships, spiritual love, and rivalry. While lesbianism is a theme commonly associated with yuri, not all characters in yuri media are necessarily non-heterosexual; Welker summarizes that whether yuri characters are lesbians is a very complicated issue.The question of whether a character in a yuri work is a lesbian or bisexual can only be determined if the character describes themselves in these terms, though the majority yuri works do not explicitly define the sexual orientation of their characters, and instead leave the matter to reader interpretation.

Nominal sexual content

Unlike yaoi, where explicit depictions of sexual acts are commonplace and stories typically climax with the central couple engaging in anal intercourse, yuri works generally avoid depictions of graphic sex scenes; sexual acts in yuri are rarely more explicit than kissing and the caressing of breasts. Kazumi Nagaike of Oita University notes that characters in contemporary yuri rarely conform to butch and femme dichotomies, or to the seme and uke dynamics typical in yaoi; however, she argues that “this does not mean that female sexual desire is effaced” in yuri media, but that the general avoidance of sex in yuri media clearly derives from the importance which is placed on the spiritual female-female bond.

Media

In the mid-1990s and early 2000s, some Japanese lesbian lifestyle magazines contained manga sections, including the now-defunct magazines Anise (1996–97, 2001–03) and Phryné (1995). Carmilla, an erotic lesbian publication,released an anthology of lesbian manga called Girl’s Only. Additionally, Mist (1996–99), a ladies’ comic manga magazine, contained sexually explicit lesbian-themed manga as part of a section dedicated to lesbian-interest topics.

The first publication marketed exclusively as yuri was Sun Magazine’s manga anthology magazine Yuri Hentai, which was released between June 2003 and November 2004 in quarterly installments, ending with only five issues. After the magazine’s discontinuation, Comic Yuri Hime was launched by Ichijinsha in July 2005 as a revival of the magazine, containing manga by many of the authors who had had work serialized in Yuri Shimai. Like its predecessor, Comic Yuri Hime was also published quarterly but went on to release bimonthly on odd months from January 2011 to December 2016, after which it became monthly.

Analysis

The first magazine to study the demographics of its readers was Yuri Shimai (2003–2004), who estimated the proportion of women at almost 70%, and that the majority of them were either teenagers or women in their thirties who were already interested in shōjo and yaoi manga. In 2008, Ichijinsha made a demographic study for its two magazines Comic Yuri Hime and Comic Yuri Hentai S, the first being targeted to women, the second to men. The study reveals that women accounted for 73% of Comic Yuri Hime readership, while in Comic Yuri Hime S, men accounted for 62%. The publisher noted, however, that readers of the latter magazine also tended to read the first, which led to their merger in 2010. Regarding the age of women for Comic Yuri Hime, 27% of them were under 20 years old, 27% between 20 and 24 years old, 23% between 25 and 29 years old, and 23% over 30 years old. As of 2017, the ratio between men and women is said to have shifted to about 6:4, thanks in part to the Comic Yuri Hime S merge and the mostly male readership YuruYuri brought with it.

As mixed-sex education became more common in the post-war era and Class S literature declined as a means to disseminate homosocial bonds, cross-dressing and yaoi emerged as the primary modes in literature for women to criticize and resist patriarchy. The emergence of yuri allowed for a return to Class S-style homosociality, of which homosexuality is a component. Thus, Nagaike asserts that Yuri Hentai does not conform to the political vision of lesbianism espoused by philosophers like Monique Wittig that sees lesbianism as overthrowing “the political and sociological interpretation of women’s identity;” rather, yuri is closer to Adrienne Rich’s vision of a “lesbian continuum” that seeks to overthrow compulsory heterosexuality.


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